HistoricPreservation

An iconic Norfolk church aims to bend, but not break, in the face of sea level rise

Image Source: The Virginian-Pilot

Christ & St. Luke's Episcopal Church

The signs point to more risk each year. Norfolk is among U.S. cities considered most vulnerable to sea level rise, partly because its land, as throughout Hampton Roads, is sinking – a problem called subsidence. But Lewis says Christ & St. Luke’s parishioners are entrusted with an “artistic and historic treasure” and are determined to protect it.

Mary Katherine Lanzillotta, a partner in Hartman-Cox, the church’s Washington-based architectural consultant, says a multimillion-dollar renovation and restoration project would include a geothermal system that will draw from the surrounding earth to provide heating and cooling. To reduce the church’s flooding risk, “we’re hoping to add some cisterns so that we can capture some rainwater coming off the roof and hold it essentially, retain it on site to such a time that the water levels go down and we can release it.
— Stephen M. Katz, The Virginian-Pilot

Click for Video

Courtesy of The Virginian-Pilot

Historic DC Patterson Mansion's makeover now complete

Images courtesy of Ampeer Residences

Patterson Mansion

Ampeer Dupont Circle—a highly-detailed renovation of the legendary Patterson Mansion—will open its doors in July. The property owned and developed by private real estate development company Saul Urban, will offer 92 uniquely-designed residential units featuring 350 square feet each.
— Evelina Croitoru, Multi-Housing News

Dupont Circle's Patterson Mansion, a sneak peak

All photos by Michelle Goldchain, CurbedDC

Patterson Mansion

In July 2017, Dupont Circle’s Patterson Mansion will open its doors with 92 high-end, fully-furnished residential units and a variety of amenities, thanks to D.C.-based developer Saul Urban in partnership with Rooney Properties.

The micro-units built in the two structures range in square footage from the mid-300s to the late-500s. Leases go as low as three months with the intention to appeal to the city’s transient class, which includes diplomats, politicos, and executives.
— Michelle Goldchain, CurbedDC

Inside the micro-unit transformation of Dupont Circle's historic Patterson Mansion

Photos by Jon Banister, Bisnow | Renderings courtesy of Saul Urban

Patterson Mansion

The developer, in partnership with Rooney Properties, has renovated the mansion into 22 small apartment units, with another 70 in a newly built, connected glass building, and has turned the mansion’s common areas into amenity spaces. The renovation is nearing completion and the building will welcome its first residents in July.
— Jon Banister, Bisnow

AIA Northern Virginia Honors Cardozo High School with a Jurors' Citation Award

Cardozo High School  Architect of Record & Design Architect: Hartman-Cox Architects // School Architect: Grimm + Parker Architects

Cardozo High School
Architect of Record & Design Architect: Hartman-Cox Architects // School Architect: Grimm + Parker Architects

On Tuesday, June 14, AIA Northern Virginia held its annual Design Awards Celebration at LMI’s new headquarters in Tysons, designed by Gensler. The event was a delightful celebration of the winning projects. Francis L. Cardozo Education Campus won Jurors’ Citation in Historic Architecture
— AIA Northern Virginia

Work underway to transform historic Dupont Circle mansion into upscale rentals

Patterson Mansion

The historic neoclassical Patterson House at 15 Dupont Circle in Washington has been watching over the changes in the neighborhood since its completion in 1903.

The ornate, intricately carved limestone mansion, home to President Calvin Coolidge and, most recently, the headquarters of The Washington Club, one of the city’s oldest women’s social clubs, is the midst of its own transformation.

Manhattan Construction is managing the project for SB-Urban LLC and Rooney Properties, the building owners and joint developers. Hartman-Cox Architects has designed the interiors for the building, which has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1972. The mansion was designed by architect Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White and is the only remaining example of his work in Washington.

The 25,000-square-foot five-story mansion and a new 42,000-square-foot, eight-story addition will include a workout facility, a library, a dining room with a large shared kitchen, a bar and party area and an outdoor terrace for residents.
— Washington Post

Cardozo High School wins AIA|DC Chapter Award for Excellence in Historic Resources

Francis L. Cardozo High School

ArchitectureDC:  Hartman-Cox Architects with Grimm+Parker Architects wins 2014 AIA|DC Chapter Award for Excellence in Historic Resources for Francis L. Cardozo High School. 

Francis L. Cardozo High School is the city’s longest continuously operating public high school and was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993 for its cultural and architectural significance. When established, the school combined progressive design and modern pedagogy with a program that included the sciences, mechanical and fine arts, domestic science, and physical education. Today, the newly renovated school can accommodate 1,200 students and provides specialty space for 21st-century learning such as computer labs, a media center, performance areas, classrooms equipped with state-of-the-art technology, as well as a new gymnasium and a fully restored indoor pool.
— ArchitectureDC
A spirited, inspiring, and fun place for students to learn in the 21st century.
— Juror, AIA|DC Chapter Awards Historic Resources Panel

AEI taps Hartman-Cox, Grunley for new headquarters

The American Enterprise Institute will launch a $40 million renovation of the former National Trust for Historic Preservation property at Dupont Circle.

The American Enterprise Institute will launch a $40 million renovation of the former National Trust for Historic Preservation property at Dupont Circle.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation’s former Dupont Circle headquarters is being primed for a major overhaul...

... AEI has retained Grunley Construction Co. to oversee the renovations, slated to include new mechanical and electrical systems, a restored limestone facade and new level below the building’s existing basement. The improvements were designed by Hartman-Cox Architects and are slated to be completed by August 2015.
— Washington Business Journal